Good introductions for internet dating

Although the data shows this advice holds true for both sexes, it’s mostly directed at guys, because they are way more likely to talk about looks.

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We know that’s going to piss a lot of people off, and we’re more or less tongue-in-cheek with this advice, but it’s what the numbers say.

does help a person get noticed (reply rate 56%), but maybe that shouldn’t be a surprise on a site that is itself named for a member of the Classical pantheon.

Example 2: Genuine and Modest Hey there, my name's Dave. Even if your life's dream is to become the world's greatest thumb-wrestler, I totally dig it. (well, only if my mom isn't at home.) During the day, I can be found sitting in an office cubicle, feverishing tapping my phone with hopes of getting a new high score on Candy Crush.

According to my sister, the girls I've met in the "real world" have been less-than-stellar (even though I thought my dating life was perfectly fine! So at her request, I've decided to try something completely new and jump into the world of online dating. I'm 28 years old and work as a unit clerk at a local hospital. I like to spend my evenings watching re-runs of Felecity while sipping on a glass of Chardonnay.

) that are all clearly referencing something important to the sender, the recipient, or, ideally, both.

Talking about specific things that interest you or that you might have in common with someone is a time-honored way to make a connection, and we have proof here that it works.

We analyzed over 500,000 first contacts on our dating site, Ok Cupid.

Our program looked at keywords and phrases, how they affected reply rates, and what trends were statistically significant.

It can help your love life, and, besides, if there really was a god, wouldn’t first messages Though this post talks in detail about the content of people’s messages on Ok Cupid, all messages have been anonymized, with sender and recipient data and all IP and timestamp information stripped out.

In addition, our analysis program looked at messages only two or three words at a time, to track the success of certain words or phrases (like “what’s up” vs. The program then aggregated results by phrase before presenting the data.

On the other hand, more general compliments seem to work well: is almost always used to describe the way something or someone looks, and you can see how that works out. After all, the way you choose to start your initial message to someone is the “first impression of your first impression.” The results surprised us: perform better, bucking the general “be literate” rule.