naijadating com Government influence in teen dating abuse

Risk factors have been defined as "attributes or characteristics that are associated with an increased probability of [its] reception and/or expression" (Hotaling & Sugarman, 1990 p. Risk factors are correlates of dating violence and not necessarily causative factors.

Thus, they may have implications for prevention program, but they may also be outcomes that have implications for treatment.

At-risk groups for teen violence Some groups are more likely than others to engage in youth violence.

Here are the teen violence risk factors associated with the family and home situation (2): Risk factors for teen violence at school The school environment can also contribute to an increased risk of violent behavior in your teen.

Here are some of the school risk factors that your teen may be violent (1): Risk factors for teen violence from the community Not only are there individual, family and school risk factors that your teen may be violent, but the community also offers risk factors.

This positions Boys and Girls Clubs to have a significant influence in helping to prevent youth violence.

This national project will develop, deliver and test a dating violence prevention program at eight clubs with 300 students in grades seven to nine, with the potential to ultimately support all 650 clubs located across the country.

Additionally, there are usually several complex causes of teenage violence.

And because the causes are so varied, it can be difficult to determine what could trigger teen violence.

A number of school based programs focusing on reducing violence in teen dating relationships and promoting healthy respectful relationships show promising results.

The majority of these programs have focused on increasing students' awareness and knowledge about dating violence, changing attitudes and norms that condone violence, and building conflict resolution and communication skills.

Although there are methodological problems accurately determining prevalence rates, a conservative estimate is that one in three adolescents has experienced physical or sexual violence in a dating relationship (Avery-Leaf, Cascardi, O'Leary, & Cano, 1997).

These rates are higher when verbal abuse is included in the definition.

Key risk factors consistently found in the literature to be associated with inflicting dating violence include the following: holding norms accepting or justifying the use of violence in dating relationships (Malik et al., 1997; O'Keefe, 1997); having friends in violent relationships (Arriaga & Foshee, 2004); exposure to violence in one's family and community violence (Foo & Margolin, 1995, O'Keefe, 1997; Schwartz et al., 1997); alcohol and drug use (O'Keeffe et al., 1986; Silverman et al., 2001); and a having a history of aggression (Riggs & O'Leary, 1989, Chase et al., 1998).